Food for the restless mind

Crunchy Coleslaw

When we saw red cabbage at the maketi the other day we were very excited. Mum’s friend Dagmar had been looking for red cabbage without much luck for some time, so we bought two thinking we would give one to her. Turns out she’d already bought a heap. So that left us with two red cabbages, and no idea what to do with them. Enter trusty ol’ Google. After a bit of time spent bouncing around different websites I had a rough idea of what to do. I then went into the kitchen to stare into the depths of the fridge, looking for inspiration. After a while I pulled out some veggies and fresh coriander, grabbing an apple from the bench for a bit of variety.

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Mexican inspired Brown Rice Casserole

Over the past few weeks I’ve seen quite a few recipes floating around for rice base casseroles. Mum and I have recently fallen in love with brown rice, so I thought why not give a rice casserole a try with our new favourite food. None of the recipes I found seemed quite right (not enough vegetables, ingredients we didn’t have, too much cheese) so this recipe is an amalgam of several different sources.

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Food for a restless mind

Mustard Chicken

Mustard chicken is a staple in our household. It is a family favourite and a comfort food, and it’s just plain yummy. I wasn’t actually going to post this recipe because I consider it such a ‘basic’ meal rather than something new or interesting. As such I also only have photos of the finished product. Luckily it’s not a particularly difficult recipe.

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Tongan Lessons: Cooking

My mum and I have been learning Tonga for the last few months. Our Tongan teacher Taua suggested that as food is such an important part of Tongan culture we should have a lesson where we cook Tongan food. We made lū moa (chicken wrapped in taro leaves), vesitapolo kale (vegetable curry), ufi (yam), and vai siaine (bananas boiled in coconut cream). Because this cooking was part of a Tongan lesson, I’m going to try to write up this post in Tongan, and English. Continue reading