Chicken and Corn Chowder

This is a family favourite that we haven’t had for ages. The recent influx of ears of sweet corn into Tonga reminded us to give it a go, and it’s as delicious as ever.

This recipe is inspired by Jamie Oliver’s Smoky Haddock Corn Chowder from his Thirty Minute Meals cookbook. We’ve always substituted chicken for haddock (mostly because we had no idea where to get smoked haddock), but if you want to try it with your favourite fish it will still be delicious.

Chop up the bacon and chuck it in a large saucepan with some olive oil. Stir it continuously so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan, and cook it until it’s golden. Finely chop the spring onion, add them to the pan, and stir them through the bacon.

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We didn’t have any potatoes in the house, but we were recently gifted some ‘ufi (yam) so I used ‘ufi instead of potatoes which worked nicely. Chop up whatever starchy vegetable you’re using, and your chicken (or fish) and add it to the pot.  Stir the contents of the pot so they all mix together nicely. Make sure you stir the pot occasionally so nothing sticks to the bottom too badly (it’s fine if it sticks a bit, you just don’t want anything to burn).

If you can get ears of corn this is the point where you have to cut the kernels off the cob (if you’re using canned corn kernels just give ‘em a rinse and you’re done). The easiest way to remove, and collect, the corn kernels is put a clean tea towel on the bench and hold the corn cob upright on the towel and carefully run a sharp knife down the cob at the base of the kernels. Do this all the way around the cob. When you’ve done this to all of the ears of corn you can then easily gather up the tea towel and tip the corn kernels into the pot.

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Add the thyme, and bay leaves (if you’ve got them) then cover everything with the chicken stock. Put the lid on and leave to cook for 15-20 minutes checking on it occasionally, or until the potatoes are nice and soft.

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We tend to serve our chowder with a big dollop of Greek yoghurt or sour cream to stir through the chowder before you eat it.

Ingredients

  • 4 rashers of bacon
  • A small bunch of spring onions
  • 400g of potatoes (or ‘ufi. Manioke or taro is probably fine too. You just need a relatively plain starchy root vegetable)
  • 300g of chicken breast or fish
  • 4-5 ears of corn or 1 400g tin of corn kernels
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 sprigs of thyme (about 2-3 tsp)
  • 1L of chicken stock
  • Optional: 1 heaped desert spoon of Greek yoghurt or sour cream

Method

  1. Chop up the bacon and chuck it in a large saucepan with some olive oil. Stir it continuously so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan, and cook it until it’s golden. Finely chop the spring onion, add them to the pan, and stir them through the bacon.
  2. Chop up whatever starchy vegetable you’re using, and your chicken (or fish) and add it to the pot. Stir the contents of the pot so they all mix together nicely. Make sure you stir the pot occasionally so nothing sticks to the bottom too badly (it’s fine if it sticks a bit, you just don’t want anything to burn).
  3. If you can get ears of corn this is the point where you have to cut the kernels off the cob (if you’re using canned corn kernels just give ‘em a rinse and you’re done). The easiest way to remove, and collect, the corn kernels is put a clean tea towel on the bench and hold the corn cob upright on the towel and carefully run a sharp knife down the cob at the base of the kernels. Do this all the way around the cob. When you’ve done this to all of the ears of corn you can then easily gather up the tea towel and tip the corn kernels into the pot.
  4. Add the thyme, and bay leaves (if you’ve got them) then cover everything with the chicken stock. Put the lid on and leave to cook for 15-20 minutes checking on it occasionally, or until the potatoes are nice and soft.
  5. We tend to serve our chowder with a big dollop of Greek yoghurt or sour cream to stir through the chowder before you eat it.

 

 

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